We have an Altar

We have an Altar

“We have an altar, whereof they have no right to eat which serve the tabernacle.” Hebrews 13:10

The altar is the cross where Jesus was sacrificed.

He suffered and died outside the city gate, away from those that would prevent us in order “that he might sanctify the people with his own blood, suffered without the gate.” Hebrews 13:12

Hebrews 13:13 says, “Let us go forth therefore unto him without the camp, bearing his reproach.

How do you do that? Look no further for in the same chapter it is said;

  • let us offer the sacrifice of praise to God continually, that is, the fruit of our lips giving thanks to his name, Hebrews 13:15
  • Let brotherly love continue, Hebrews 13:1
  • to do good and to communicate forget not: for with such sacrifices God is well pleased, Hebrews 13:16
  • Remember them that are in bonds, as bound with them; and them which suffer adversity, as being yourselves also in the body, Hebrews 13:3
  • Be not forgetful to entertain strangers: for thereby some have entertained angels unawares, Hebrews 13:2
  • Let your conversation be without covetousness; and be content with such things as ye have, Hebrews 13:5
  • Marry well, Marriage is honourable in all, and the bed undefiled: but whoremongers and adulterers God will judge, Hebrews 13:4
  • Remember them which have the rule over you, who have spoken unto you the word of God: whose faith follow, considering the end of their conversation, Hebrews 13:7
  • Be not carried about with divers and strange doctrines, Hebrews 13:9

We have an altar

If you are still serving God through the old system, obeying Jewish laws you’re lost – you can never be helped.

Discernment

Above I said, “Remember them which have the rule over you, who have spoken unto you the word of God: whose faith follow, considering the end of their conversation,” Hebrews 13:7

Note: it says, “…whose faith follow, considering the end of their conversation.”

Discernment is nothing more than the ability to decide between truth and error, right and wrong. It is the process of making careful distinctions in our thinking about truth, i.e., the ability to think with discernment is synonymous with an ability to think biblically.

“For the word of God is quick, and powerful, and sharper than any twoedged sword, piercing even to the dividing asunder of soul and spirit, and of the joints and marrow, and is a discerner of the thoughts and intents of the heart. [13] Neither is there any creature that is not manifest in his sight: but all things are naked and opened unto the eyes of him with whom we have to do.” Hebrews 4:12-13

1 Thessalonians 5:21-22 teaches that it is the responsibility of every Christian to be discerning: “But examine everything carefully; hold fast to that which is good; abstain from every form of evil.” Apostle John issues the same sentiment, “Do not believe every spirit, but test the spirits to see whether they are from God; because many false prophets have gone out into the world” (1 John 4:1). According to the New Testament, discernment is not optional for the believer-it is a requirement.

The key to living an uncompromising life lies in one’s ability to exercise discernment in every area of his or her life. For example, failure to distinguish between truth and error leaves the Christian subject to all manner of false teaching. False teaching then leads to an unbiblical mindset, which results in unfruitful and disobedient living-a recipe for compromise.

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